•Speak up when it happens. Let the bully know that their behavior isn’t acceptable. Just be professional about it.

•Request a meeting with the bully. Ask to talk to him or her “discreetly and privately” or include another person you both agree to. Stick to the facts, dates, and infractions. Listen before reacting or responding. 

•Try to see his or her side. Is the bad attitude coming from a misunderstanding or lack of communication? Career coach Hallie Crawford suggests asking them questions about where they’re coming from. It can help you find the issues you need to deal with. 

•Issue a warning. If you try to work it out but the bully hasn’t changed, let them know you’re serious. Tell them how you feel and that you want to work it out before you go to HR about it. Be prepared to follow through if the warning doesn’t work.

•Develop an action plan. Don’t just say that things have to change, make a plan together to move things from bad to better.

•Consider the source. If they are a curmudgeon at heart, an unpleasant soul who is a scrooge to everyone, deciding to overlook it is an option. Especially, if you like your job, the company, and your coworkers.